101-meatball-recipes

101 Meatball Recipes (The Complete Guide to Meatballs)

Everyone has a secret to their meatballs.  I soak slices of bread in almond milk instead of using breadcrumbs, others add a touch of cocoa and some people swear that cinnamon is the secret ingredient.  You see, the simple meatball, the classic comfort food, is anything but simple.


This roundup of meatball recipes grew beyond my wildest dreams.  I only included the meatball recipes that I plan to make myself.   Please be aware that if an ingredient calls for a non-kosher ingredient, I included it here, marked with an asterisk, because I am confident that it can easily be adapted for the kosher kitchen. Scroll to the end of the post for my notes on how I would do this.


Beef Meatball Recipes

Beef is the go-to for meatballs, after all, that’s how Grandma made them, right?  Sure.  But did Grandma make her meatballs this way?

Spaghetti and Giant Meatballs - The View From The Great Island

Photo Credit: Spaghetti and Giant Meatballs (The View From The Great Island)


Turkey Meatballs

Rosemary Honey Turkey Meatballs - Cooking on the Weekend

Photo credit: Cooking on the Weekends (Rosemary Honey Turkey Meatballs)


Chicken Meatballs

Matzoh Ball Soup with Chicken Meatballs - Foodie Crush

Photo Credit: Foodie Crush (Matzoh Ball Soup with Chicken Meatballs)


Lamb and Veal Meatballs

Greek Meatballs with Mint and Dried Apricot - Running to the Kitchen

Photo: Running to the Kitchen (Greek Meatballs with Mint and Dried Apricot)


Vegetarian Meatballs

This is the most inventive and exciting part of this roundup.  I love the different un/meatball options that I came across while researching this post!

Veggie Meatballs - Diethood

Photo Credit: Diethood (Veggie Meatballs)


Meatballs with Cheese*

I’m not one to cook with cheese.  My vegan cheese sauce is a go-to dairy free replacement.  If you’re dairy free or cooking in a kosher kitchen, you could make a un/meatball with these dairy options, or choose a dairy free alternative.   Scroll to the end of the post for my notes on how I would adapt these recipes for a kosher kitchen or just sit here and drool over these pictures of meatballs that you might never eat.

Kickin' Meatballs - Yours and Mine are Ours

Photo Credit: Yours and Mine are Ours (Kickin’ Meatballs)


Middle Eastern Meatballs

Most people think of Italy when they think of meatballs, but we’ve travelling around the world with this round up.

Kofte de Pirasa - Passover Meatballs - Kosher Like Me

Photo credit: Kosher Like Me (Kofte de Pirasa)


“Chinese Takeout” Meatballs

Easy Asian Chicken Meatball Stir Fry with Spring Vegetables - Apron Strings

Photo credit: Apron Strings (Easy Asian Chicken Meatball Stir Fry with Spring Vegetables)


Meatball Subs and Sandwiches

Gluten Free Vegan Meatball Mix - Fat Free Vegan

Photo credit: Fat Free Vegan (Gluten Free Vegan Meatball Mix)


BBQ and Bourbon Meatballs

Pomegranate Meatballs - Joy of Kosher

Photo credit: Joy of Kosher (Pomegranate Meatballs)


Slow Cooker Meatballs

Make it in the morning and eat it at night.  One of my favorite ways to cook.

Slow Cooker Spinach Meatballs and Spaghetti Squash - Kitchen Tested

Photo credit: Kitchen Tested (Slow Cooker Spinach Meatballs and Spaghetti Squash)

Adapting meatball recipes for a kosher kitchen

Some of the recipes above call for dairy ingredients, or other things that won’t work in a kosher kitchen.  Here are some of the ways I suggest you adapt the recipes if you need to.

Often, cheese is used as a garnish rather than a primary ingredient.  When that’s the case, skip it.  In the US, Daiya Foods make a great range of dairy free cheese that melts just like the real thing.  You can also make your own cashew cheese sauce.

Milk is an easy one to replace!  Coconut milk and almond milk are your friend.  There are a wide range of dairy free alternatives that work well in almost any recipe.

If a recipe calls for butter, you could substitute coconut oil for a healthy dairy-free alternative.

Pork is often a secondary meat in many of these recipes.

You can either double the primary meat, or turn the recipe into a beef and lamb combination.

Some Worcestershire Sauces are made from anchovies or fish.  If you have concerns about mixing fish and meat, Wan Ja San make a 100% vegetarian sauce (available here via Amazon or Whole Foods).

You could also replace with soy sauce or coconut aminos, the flavor will be a little different, but it’s a good second choice. 

What have I missed?  Let me know which of these recipes really speaks to you in the comments, or add your own! If one of these meatball recipes perhaps I’ll make a version of my own and post it here.




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